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AIP Chicken Sweet Potato Hash Recipe

Louise Hendon | December 2
AIP Chicken Sweet Potato Hash Recipe #aip https://healingautoimmune.com/aip-chicken-sweet-potato-hash-recipe

Scrumptious and savory, this AIP chicken sweet potato hash recipe deserves a place at your dinner table.

What is Hash?

Perhaps when you think of hash, your mind wanders to hash browns. Greasy and delicious, these revered potato bits surface in many kitchens and restaurants come breakfast time.

But potatoes don’t have a monopoly on the hash game: Hash often describes a meatier dish, such as this chicken sweet potato hash.

A hash can be a blend of potatoes and meat, and often contains spices such as paprika, onion powder, oregano, salt, and pepper. Onions are another ingredient that appears in many hash concoctions.

The meat varies; it can be anything from pork to beef to chicken, although roast beef and corned beef are typical. Today, in America, it is commonly eaten for breakfast.

Eggs are frequently served along with hash, although they are not allowed on AIP.

The History of Hash

Hash isn’t so much about the contents of the dish – it’s how it is prepared. It was derived from “hacer,” a French word that means “to chop.”

Sometimes the definition of hash is even broader. Circling back to the meaning of the word, some use hash to refer to any combination of chopped up ingredients.

The origin of the word may be French, but Americans have flocked to hash for quite some time. “Hash houses” featuring the signature greasy mix popped up in the early 19th century.

Corned beef from a can was a popular hash overseas during World War II when meat was being rationed.

Getting Greasy

Part of the essence of hash, and perhaps the signature of its mass appeal, is its inherent greasiness.

You’re going to need some kind of fat or oil to achieve that.

This is where a lot of restaurants and hash recipes will steer you wrong. It’s not the fat that’s the problem – it’s the type of fat. Many of them point you in the direction of canola oil or vegetable oil.

These highly processed, inflammatory oils don’t have a place in anyone’s diet, but they’re especially concerning if you have an autoimmune condition.

This hash recipe calls for coconut oil instead. This substitute is a better option for AIP. You’ll note I also opted for a sweet potato rather than a white potato.

Whys and Hows of AIP

Congratulations! Committing to improving your health by following autoimmune protocol is admirable.

While your initiative is impressive, everyone needs some guidance when they’re first getting started…and along the way.

I encourage you to check out this comprehensive guide to paleo autoimmune protocol. It’s got great information for those who are just starting out and offers a great refresher course for those who have followed AIP for a while.

AIP Chicken Sweet Potato Hash Recipe #aip https://healingautoimmune.com/aip-chicken-sweet-potato-hash-recipe

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AIP Chicken Sweet Potato Hash Recipe #aip https://healingautoimmune.com/aip-chicken-sweet-potato-hash-recipe

AIP Chicken Sweet Potato Hash Recipe


  • Author: Louise Hendon
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings
  • Category: Dinner
  • Cuisine: French

Description

This scrumptious and savory AIP chicken sweet potato hash recipe deserves a place at your dinner table.


Ingredients

  • 2 chicken breasts, diced
  • 1 small green apple (150 g), grated or finely diced
  • 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil (30 ml), to cook chicken with
  • 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil (30 ml), to cook hash with
  • 1 small sweet potato (130 g), grated or thinly sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon of ginger powder (1 g)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon powder (1 g)
  • Salt, to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large skillet, melt the coconut oil over medium-high heat. In batches, add the chicken to the skillet and fry until browned.
  2. Meanwhile, add the coconut oil to a separate large skillet over medium heat. Add the sweet potato to the skillet and sauté until soft, about 6 to 8 minutes.  Add the chicken into the skillet.
  3. Add the apple, ginger powder, and cinnamon to the skillet and sauté for an additional 1 to 2 minutes. Season with salt, if desired.

Notes

All nutritional data are estimated and based on per serving amounts.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 360
  • Sugar: 5 g
  • Fat: 24 g
  • Carbohydrates: 12 g
  • Fiber: 2 g
  • Protein: 24 g

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